The Downside Of Being Away From TV While Making TV As part of a reality show, contestants spent months away from civilization in the Scottish Highlands without TV. They emerged to find out their reality show was off the air.
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The Downside Of Being Away From TV While Making TV

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The Downside Of Being Away From TV While Making TV

The Downside Of Being Away From TV While Making TV

The Downside Of Being Away From TV While Making TV

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As part of a reality show, contestants spent months away from civilization in the Scottish Highlands without TV. They emerged to find out their reality show was off the air.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep. Reality show contestants spent too much time in the wilderness. They were part of "Eden," a show on Britain's Channel 4 and spent months away from civilization in the Scottish islands. They didn't have TV and finally emerged to news that their reality show was off the air. It hasn't been broadcast for months. And it's not clear when the episodes will resume, which prompts an ancient question - if a person lives in the forest and is not on TV, does she make a sound? It's MORNING EDITION.

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