Fresh Air Weekend: Illustrator Emil Ferris; 'Devil And Webster'; For-Profit Colleges Ferris had to learn to draw again after West Nile left her paralyzed. Maureen Corrigan reviews Jean Hanff Korelitz's new novel. Tressie McMillan Cottom says for-profit colleges sell "risky education."
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Fresh Air Weekend: Illustrator Emil Ferris; 'Devil And Webster'; For-Profit Colleges

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Fresh Air Weekend: Illustrator Emil Ferris; 'Devil And Webster'; For-Profit Colleges

Fresh Air Weekend: Illustrator Emil Ferris; 'Devil And Webster'; For-Profit Colleges

Fresh Air Weekend: Illustrator Emil Ferris; 'Devil And Webster'; For-Profit Colleges

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/522179636/522307200" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Ferris takes on real and imagined horrors in My Favorite Thing Is Monsters. Fantagraphics hide caption

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Fantagraphics

Ferris takes on real and imagined horrors in My Favorite Thing Is Monsters.

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Fresh Air Weekend highlights some of the best interviews and reviews from past weeks, and new program elements specially paced for weekends. Our weekend show emphasizes interviews with writers, filmmakers, actors and musicians, and often includes excerpts from live in-studio concerts. This week:

In 'Monsters,' Graphic Novelist Emil Ferris Embraces The Darkness Within: After West Nile virus left her paralyzed, the Chicago illustrator had to relearn how to draw. She says that experience was key to the publication of My Favorite Thing Is Monsters.

Smart, Satirical 'Devil And Webster' Takes On College Identity Politics: Jean Hanff Korelitz's new novel surveys student life at a New England college in turmoil. Critic Maureen Corrigan says The Devil and Webster is "wittily on target."

How For-Profit Colleges Sell 'Risky Education' To The Most Vulnerable: Tressie McMillan Cottom worked in enrollment at two for-profit colleges, but quit because she felt uncomfortable selling students an education they couldn't afford. Her new book is Lower Ed.

You can listen to the original interviews here:

In 'Monsters,' Graphic Novelist Emil Ferris Embraces The Darkness Within

Smart, Satirical 'Devil And Webster' Takes On College Identity Politics

How For-Profit Colleges Sell 'Risky Education' To The Most Vulnerable