Listeners Create #NPRpoetry Using Prominent Political Themes As National Poetry Month continues, we share two listeners' poems about education funding in Oklahoma and another about the importance of activism.

Listeners Create #NPRpoetry Using Prominent Political Themes

Listeners Create #NPRpoetry Using Prominent Political Themes

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As National Poetry Month continues, we share two listeners' poems about education funding in Oklahoma and another about the importance of activism.

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Now we're going to get some more of your Twitter poetry submissions. All this month, we're inviting you to send us your original poems of 140 characters or less. This week - quite a few have had what I suppose you could call political themes. Here's one from Jenny Flower from Tulsa, Okla.

JENNY FLOWER: Education for sale. Gently used, under value, no longer need, asking chump change in Oklahoma, will ship internationally.

MARTIN: Jenny told us this poem was inspired by political battles over public education funding in her state. Here's a poem by Thomas Hardigan in Vermont. He tells us he wrote it after attending a rally.

THOMAS HARDIGAN: Social justice means to me compassion and dignity, showing up, giving proof, not standing back, just aloof. Be present connect, direct.

MARTIN: Thanks, Jenny and Thomas. Remember you can check out all of the submissions. Just follow the hashtag #nprpoetry. Keep sending us your poems, and keep an eye on your Twitter feed, too, we might just tweet you back and ask you to read it on the air.

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