Sunday Puzzle: Don't Go Chasing Waterfalls, Please Stick To The Best Songs To 'Solve' This week Stephen Dubner of "Freakonomics" joins Lynn Neary and Will Shortz to play the Sunday Puzzle.
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Sunday Puzzle: Don't Go Chasing Waterfalls, Please Stick To The Best Songs To 'Solve'

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Sunday Puzzle: Don't Go Chasing Waterfalls, Please Stick To The Best Songs To 'Solve'

Sunday Puzzle: Don't Go Chasing Waterfalls, Please Stick To The Best Songs To 'Solve'

Sunday Puzzle: Don't Go Chasing Waterfalls, Please Stick To The Best Songs To 'Solve'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/525270836/525310277" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Sunday Puzzle. NPR hide caption

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Sunday Puzzle.

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On-Air Challenge:

For each five letter word, change the middle letter to two new letters to get a familiar six letter word. For example if the word is " being" you would say "belong" changing the "i" to an "l-o."

1. Minor

2. Croon

3. Favor

4. Count

5. Dinar

6. Amore

Last week's challenge: A spoonerism is when you change the initial consonant sounds of two words in a phrase to get a new phrase. For example, "Tames Jailer" is a spoonerism of the singer James Taylor. "Spark Mitts" is a spoonerism of the swimmer Mark Spitz. The name of what famous entertainer — first and last names — has a two-word spoonerism meaning "A runny variety of cheese"?

Puzzle answer: "Bruce Lee," from "loose brie"

Puzzle winner: Jan Wolitzky from Madison, N.J.

Next challenge (will happen in two weeks): It's a two-week creative challenge because we'll be having a special guest next week. The object is to mashup the titles of past No. 1 hits on the Billboard 100 pop chart to tell a story. For example: "I Shot The Sheriff" "The Night the Lights Went Out In Georgia." "The Morning After" "I'll Be There" "Leaving On A Jet Plane."

Wikipedia has a list of the Billboard No. 1 singles from the Hot 100 era, 1958 to present, which you can use. Your story can include up to seven song titles. Entries will be judged on cleverness, naturalness of reading, memorablness of the songs and overall elegance. You can send up to three entries and the best one, based on Will's opinion, will play the puzzle on the air in two weeks.

Submit Your Answer

If you know the answer to next week's challenge, submit it here. Listeners who submit correct answers win a chance to play the on-air puzzle. Important: Include a phone number where we can reach you. The deadline is Thursday, May 4 at 3 p.m. ET.