Japan Holds Annual Crying Sumo Baby Ceremony In Japan over the weekend, little ones dressed in sumo outfits were held up on a stage by sumo wrestlers. The infrants' cries are supposed to drive out demons and protect them from troubles.

Japan Holds Annual Crying Sumo Baby Ceremony

Japan Holds Annual Crying Sumo Baby Ceremony

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/528570732/528570733" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

In Japan over the weekend, little ones dressed in sumo outfits were held up on a stage by sumo wrestlers. The infrants' cries are supposed to drive out demons and protect them from troubles.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Rachel Martin. A crying baby can bring a lot of things - stress, anxiety, adult tears. But in Japan, screaming infants bring good health. This past weekend, the annual crying sumo baby ceremony took place outside Tokyo. Little ones dressed in sumo outfits are held up on a stage by sumo wrestlers. The babies are understandably freaked out, so they cry. While the cries are supposed to drive out demons and protect the infants from troubles, all the parents end up in the fetal position. It's MORNING EDITION.

Copyright © 2017 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by an NPR contractor. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.