QB Aaron Rodgers Gets Class Out Of Final Exam With Retweet The sports literature teacher made a deal with her class: no final exam if Green Bay Packers quarterback Aaron Rodgers retweeted someone from the class. He did and the class got out of the test.
NPR logo

QB Aaron Rodgers Gets Class Out Of Final Exam With Retweet

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/529634887/529634888" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
QB Aaron Rodgers Gets Class Out Of Final Exam With Retweet

QB Aaron Rodgers Gets Class Out Of Final Exam With Retweet

QB Aaron Rodgers Gets Class Out Of Final Exam With Retweet

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/529634887/529634888" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The sports literature teacher made a deal with her class: no final exam if Green Bay Packers quarterback Aaron Rodgers retweeted someone from the class. He did and the class got out of the test.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Rachel Martin. What some kids will do to get out of a big test. After getting pressure from her students, sports literature teacher Laura Roberts agreed to cancel the final exam if Green Bay Packers quarterback Aaron Rodgers retweeted someone from her class.

A student named Peyton Meyer tweeted out the request to Rodgers, adding this note about his teacher - please retweet, she's your biggest fan. Rodgers responded - I'm sure a sports lit final is very important, but here you go. It's MORNING EDITION.

Copyright © 2017 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.