Watch The Secret Sisters Play 'Mississippi' Live For Folk Alley The Rogers sisters say this murder ballad both offers perspective on a character they introduced in an earlier song and reflects their own career challenges.

Studio Sessions

Folk Alley Presents: The Secret Sisters, 'Mississippi' (Live)

After a few years spent regrouping from the trying experience of being dropped by their first record label, The Secret Sisters have returned with their third LP, You Don't Own Me Anymore, produced by Brandi Carlile. Folk Alley caught up with Laura and Lydia Rogers at this year's 30A Songwriters Festival in Florida for an exclusive session at our pop-up studio, not far from the beach.

Here, The Secret Sisters perform "Mississippi," a murder ballad from the new album which they describe as a sequel to "Iuka," from their 2014 release, Put Your Needle Down. "'Mississippi' offers a different perspective to the story of 'Iuka,' and it sheds some light on a not-so-likable character," the sisters say. "It helps you appreciate the character a little more and to see where he's coming from, even though he committed a horrible act. You see into his story and why he is the way he is."

The Rogers sisters further describe the story as being, in some ways, a reflection of their career struggles and "trying to understand all the sides of a difficult situation."

SET LIST

  • "Mississippi"

Watch The Secret Sisters' full Folk Alley session from the 30A Songwriters Festival at FolkAlley.com.

Video produced by Linda Fahey (Folk Alley) and Jeff Oehler, Sue Bibeau and Redia Spada (Beehive Productions.)

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