People Are More Likely To Eat Veggies With Fancy Names, Researchers Say Stanford University researchers found diners did not go for foods labeled as sugar free or low fat. Take an item like carrots, and then call it: twisted citrus glazed carrots — now you're talking.
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People Are More Likely To Eat Veggies With Fancy Names, Researchers Say

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People Are More Likely To Eat Veggies With Fancy Names, Researchers Say

People Are More Likely To Eat Veggies With Fancy Names, Researchers Say

People Are More Likely To Eat Veggies With Fancy Names, Researchers Say

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/532724729/532724730" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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Stanford University researchers found diners did not go for foods labeled as sugar free or low fat. Take an item like carrots, and then call it: twisted citrus glazed carrots — now you're talking.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Rachel Martin. Researchers from Stanford University set out to prove a theory - if you give vegetables and other healthy foods fancy names, will people eat more of them? The answer was yes. Diners did not go for foods labeled as sugar-free or low fat because why would you? But if you take an item like carrots and then call it twisted citrus-glazed carrots, well, now you're talking. So to review, green beans? No way. Electric garlic-infused green beans? Totally. It's MORNING EDITION.

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