Jeff Sessions Faces Questions About Trump's Firing Of James Comey Attorney General Jeff Sessions testified before the Senate Intelligence Committee on Tuesday as part of its investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election.

Jeff Sessions Faces Questions About Trump's Firing Of James Comey

Jeff Sessions Faces Questions About Trump's Firing Of James Comey

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Attorney General Jeff Sessions testified before the Senate Intelligence Committee on Tuesday as part of its investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

This evening we're covering the testimony of Attorney General Jeff Sessions before the Senate intelligence committee. One especially heated exchange was between Sessions and Democratic Senator Ron Wyden of Oregon. Wyden asked the attorney general about the former FBI Director James Comey's comments on Sessions' decision to recuse himself from the Russia investigation.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

RON WYDEN: Mr. Comey said that there were matters with respect to the recusal that were problematic and he couldn't talk about them. What are they?

JEFF SESSIONS: I - that - why don't you tell me? There are none, Senator Wyden. There are none. I can tell you that for absolute certainty.

WYDEN: We can - we...

SESSIONS: You tell - this is a secret innuendo being leaked out there about me, and I don't appreciate it. And I've tried to give my best and truthful answers to any committee I've appeared before. And it's really - people are suggesting through innuendo that I have been not honest about matters. And I've tried to be honest.

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