New Island Forms Off North Carolina's Outer Banks In the ever-changing seascape off the Outer Banks of North Carolina is a new sand bar, possibly masking as an island. The questions now is how to get to it.

New Island Forms Off North Carolina's Outer Banks

New Island Forms Off North Carolina's Outer Banks

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In the ever-changing seascape off the Outer Banks of North Carolina is a new sand bar, possibly masking as an island. The questions now is how to get to it.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Time and tide may wait for no man, but this summer, time and tide have created a new island off the Outer Banks in North Carolina. It's attracting shell seekers, photographers and fishermen. The island is a crescent, one-mile long, three football fields wide. It was just a little bump in April, visitor Janice Regan told a reporter from The Virginian Pilot. Apparently, it was Regan's grandson who named it Shelly Island because the shelling is so great. But anyone tempted to swim or paddle across should know this - the currents are really strong and dangerous. And by next year, who knows? Shelly Island could grow, attaching itself to the coast. Or it might be gone, its sands washing away back into the Atlantic.

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