Panel Questions Samurai Ken
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Panel Questions

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Panel Questions

Panel Questions

Panel Questions

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Samurai Ken

PETER SAGAL, HOST:

Right now, panel, it is time for you to answer some questions about this week's news. Phoebe, after 56 years, Mattel announced that it is finally updating Barbie's boyfriend, Ken. And so it means that kids will be able to finally buy a Ken that has what?

(LAUGHTER)

PHOEBE ROBINSON: Is it - and I wanted to take it. Should I take it (laughter)?

SAGAL: No, it is not what you think. It's, well, let me put it this way. We're not sure what it means. It either means he's a samurai or just a hipster.

ROBINSON: Oh, a man bun.

SAGAL: A man bun, yes.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

SAGAL: Man-bun Ken is actually just one of 15 updated Ken dolls that Mattel is introducing. They gave him a man bun, to which Ken said, oh, cool. Thanks for changing my hair. That's the thing I really wanted. There is nothing else I lack...

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: ...That I could possibly use. Thank you for the man bun.

(SOUNDBITE OF GINUWINE SONG, "PONY")

SAGAL: Coming up, our panelists refuse to leave. It's our Bluff the Listener game. Call 1-888-WAITWAIT to play. We'll be back in a minute with more of WAIT WAIT... DON'T TELL ME from NPR.

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