Panel Questions OkStupid, Long Live The Queen
NPR logo

Panel Questions

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/534214072/534225700" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Panel Questions

Panel Questions

Panel Questions

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/534214072/534225700" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

OkStupid, Long Live The Queen

BILL KURTIS: From NPR and WBEZ Chicago, this is WAIT WAIT...DON'T TELL ME, the NPR News quiz. I'm Bill Kurtis. We are playing this week with Brian Babylon, Phoebe Robinson and Alonzo Bodden. And here again is your host at the Chase Bank Auditorium in downtown Chicago, Peter Sagal.

(APPLAUSE)

PETER SAGAL, HOST:

Thank you very much, Bill. Thank you everybody. In just a minute Bill says, quote, "now I've had the rhyme of my life, and I owe it all to limericks."

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: If you'd like to play, give us a call at 1-888-WAITWAIT. That's 1-888-924-8924. Right now, panel, some more questions for you from the week's news. Brian, a man was caught red handed when he said a group chat to whom?

BRIAN BABYLON: Give me a hint. I mean, that's...

SAGAL: Well, generally speaking, you don't - it's all right. You want to speak to all these people. You just don't want to speak to them all the same time when they're all copied.

BABYLON: Oh, girlfriends.

SAGAL: Yes. He sent it to all the seven women he was dating at once.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

PHOEBE ROBINSON: Seven?

SAGAL: Seven. Basically, this guy named Nathan or some call him, oh, you know him, too?

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: He sent a Snapchat saying, hey, beautiful, to all seven women he was involved with at once. After roundly mocking Nathan for doing this and then dumping him, the women have kept the group going. This is true.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: They call it Nathan's beautiful girls - also true.

BABYLON: That's like - how old is he, like, 60? That sounds like (unintelligible) send all.

SAGAL: Yeah.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Apparently, this guy was not up to the challenge of keeping this many women happy at the same time.

BABYLON: Well, the thing is you have to - you got to train for that. I tell people you have to mentally train.

ROBINSON: No. To juggle seven women? How dare you.

(LAUGHTER)

BABYLON: No, I'm not justifying that Phoebe. I'm just saying...

(LAUGHTER)

BABYLON: You know, I'm just saying...

SAGAL: Oh, it's bad. It's bad, Phoebe. We completely disapprove. But if you were going to do it...

ROBINSON: You got to...

BABYLON: You have to take my course available...

(APPLAUSE)

SAGAL: Phoebe, the British royal family may be facing a crisis. According to Prince Harry, no one in the family wants to do what?

ROBINSON: Nobody wants to be king or queen or whatever.

SAGAL: That's exactly right.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

SAGAL: Nobody actually wants to be king or queen of the family. Harry is third in line for the throne after his father, Prince Charles, who at the age of 68 is still required by royal tradition to wear short pants.

(LAUGHTER)

ALONZO BODDEN: Why wouldn't you want the job? I mean, the queen...

ROBINSON: It's boring.

BODDEN: For one thing, the queen does nothing. And the side benefit is she's living forever.

SAGAL: That's true, apparently.

(LAUGHTER)

BABYLON: Yeah, she has a serum.

BODDEN: The woman is 143 years old. So, obviously, there are great health benefits to being...

SAGAL: Very true.

BODDEN: I'm just saying, if nobody wants the gig, I'll take it.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Yeah.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "ROYALS")

LORDE: (Singing) And we'll never be royals. It don't run in our blood. That kind of lux just ain't for us. We crave a different kind of buzz. Let me be your ruler.

Copyright © 2017 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.