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More Panel Questions

More Panel Questions

More Panel Questions

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We regret the errors.

BILL KURTIS: From NPR and WBEZ Chicago, this is WAIT WAIT... DON'T TELL ME! - the NPR News quiz. I'm Bill Kurtis. We are playing this week with Tom Bodett, Luke Burbank and Roxanne Roberts. And here again is your host at the Mann Center in Philadelphia, Pa., Peter Sagal.

(APPLAUSE)

PETER SAGAL, HOST:

Thank you, everybody. In just a minute, Bill doesn't want to vacuum the room himself, so he uses his Rhyme-ba (ph) in our Listener Limerick Challenge. If you'd like to play, give us a call at 1-888-WAIT-WAIT. That's 1-888-924-8924. Right now, panel, it's time for a new game that we are calling...

KURTIS: Can You Ever Forgive Us?

SAGAL: In spite of our best efforts every week to give you the scrupulously professional journalism you expect from this show, from time to time, we say something inaccurate or offensive. I know. We're surprised, too.

(APPLAUSE)

SAGAL: Well, we did both last week. And we've made those complaints into a quiz. Pick the right answer. You each get a point. Here we go. Roxanne, this week, listeners took issue with a story we discussed about a nudist in Australia who was attacked by an eagle who thought his man bits were turtle eggs.

LUKE BURBANK: I've had that happen.

SAGAL: I know. But we missed one detail of that story that some listeners pointed out to us. What was it? A, the eagle attacked the man thinking his bits were actually field mice; B, rather than fighting the eagle off, the man kind of enjoyed it or C, the entire story was a fake, and we fell for it.

ROXANNE ROBERTS: I'm going to go with C.

SAGAL: Yes, that's what happened.

ROBERTS: Yeah.

(LAUGHTER, APPLAUSE)

SAGAL: Sorry. We should have seen that. But what can I say? We just didn't want to live in a world where that wasn't true.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Tom, this week, listeners also wrote in, saying we were way too mean to Mitch McConnell. What was the specific insult our listeners were upset by? Was it A, Mitch McConnell looks like a thumb with glasses...

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: ...B, Mitch McConnell looks like a Mr. Potato Head if the potato had been mashed...

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: ...Or C, as a young man, Mitch McConnell didn't beat polio. It was that polio left his body because it couldn't stand being there any more?

(LAUGHTER)

TOM BODETT: Oh.

ROBERTS: Oh.

BODETT: Oh, you know, I think he did have polio as a child. Is it that one?

SAGAL: No, it was actually a trick question...

BODETT: Oh, thank, God.

SAGAL: ...Because it wasn't any of those.

(LAUGHTER)

BURBANK: I feel like we wouldn't be on the radio this week...

BODETT: I was going to say, you know?

BURBANK: ...If it was any of those.

SAGAL: We said Mitch McConnell looks like a chinless owl.

(LAUGHTER)

BODETT: Oh, that's right.

SAGAL: To our credit, we also didn't say...

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: No, we didn't say these, so people had no reason to complain. We didn't say Mitch McConnell looks like a jack-o'-lantern that was left out on the porch till March.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: We certainly didn't say that Mitch McConnell looks like someone dropped a bunch of facial features into a bowl of butterscotch pudding.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: We absolutely did not say...

BODETT: And thank God.

SAGAL: ...That - you know when somebody pulls out their belly skin to show you how much weight they lost? - that looks like Mitch McConnell's face.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: And we certainly never stooped to saying that Mitch McConnell's face was bleeding badly from a face-lift.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: We would never do that.

BODETT: That, that...

SAGAL: Too low even for us. Luke, listeners also wrote in - it was a good week - to tell us that we misidentified Prince Harry - you remember him? - Prince Harry...

BURBANK: Yeah.

SAGAL: ...U.K. We misidentified Prince Harry's line of succession to the throne. What was our mistake? Was it we said he was third in line, but he's really fifth? We said he's fourth, but he's second? We said he's fifth, but he's fourth? We said he's seventh, but he's eighth? We said he's fourth, but he's seventh? We said he's sixth, but he's third? Or we said he's fourth, but he's tenth?

BURBANK: I know this one. I'm going to go with the first thing you said because that's the last thing I remember.

SAGAL: That's probably - no, that's a good guess. But the correct answer is who cares?

BURBANK: Aww.

ROBERTS: Wait, that's...

SAGAL: We know.

ROBERTS: I know what it is.

SAGAL: No, Roxanne.

BURBANK: We know who cares.

ROBERTS: I know...

SAGAL: No, Roxanne.

BURBANK: We know who cares.

SAGAL: We fought a revolution so we do not have to care about this stuff.

(LAUGHTER, APPLAUSE)

SAGAL: There you have it. We're ashamed of ourselves. We sincerely apologize. We mean it.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: To those of you who are busily working on your angry emails right now, yes, we know icing is not the same as frosting. Stand down.

(LAUGHTER)

ROBERTS: Charles, William, George, Charlotte, Harry.

BURBANK: Fifth.

(APPLAUSE)

ROBERTS: (Laughter).

SAGAL: Are those the names of your cats?

(LAUGHTER)

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