How Fast Can You Read This Headline? A driver in Seattle got a $234 ticket for speeding in a school zone. He argued that the sign saying: "School speed limit 20 when children are present or when flashing" was too long. A judge agreed.
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How Fast Can You Read This Headline?

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How Fast Can You Read This Headline?

How Fast Can You Read This Headline?

How Fast Can You Read This Headline?

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/535920484/535920485" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A driver in Seattle got a $234 ticket for speeding in a school zone. He argued that the sign saying: "School speed limit 20 when children are present or when flashing" was too long. A judge agreed.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Rachel Martin. Too many words - that's how a driver from Seattle got out of a speeding ticket. Jason Canfield was going too fast in a school zone, which earned him a $234 citation. But Canfield said it was the sign's fault. It read, 20 miles per hour when children are present or when flashing. Too much information to absorb in the moment - that's what Canfield argued, and the judge agreed. In writing and apparently in traffic signs, less is more. It's MORNING EDITION.

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