Following Wimbledon Loss, Andy Murray Calls Out Casual Sexism There were many great moments at Wimbledon this week — including off the tennis court — thanks to Andy Murray.
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Following Wimbledon Loss, Andy Murray Calls Out Casual Sexism

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Following Wimbledon Loss, Andy Murray Calls Out Casual Sexism

Following Wimbledon Loss, Andy Murray Calls Out Casual Sexism

Following Wimbledon Loss, Andy Murray Calls Out Casual Sexism

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/537291311/537291312" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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There were many great moments at Wimbledon this week — including off the tennis court — thanks to Andy Murray.

KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

All right, so the second week of Wimbledon ends this weekend.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Venus Williams and Roger Federer will play in the finals.

MCEVERS: Of all the great on-the-court moments that have happened so far, there was also an off-the-court moment we wanted to make sure you didn't miss.

SHAPIRO: It happened when Britain's Andy Murray was taking questions after his loss to American Sam Querrey.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

UNIDENTIFIED REPORTER: Andy, Sam is the first U.S. player to reach a major semifinal since 2009. How would you describe the...

ANDY MURRAY: Male player.

UNIDENTIFIED REPORTER: I beg your pardon.

MURRAY: Male player, right?

UNIDENTIFIED REPORTER: Yes, the first male player. That's for sure (laughter).

MCEVERS: Male player - what Murray was doing was correcting the reporter who said Sam Querrey was the first American player to reach a major semi since 2009 because Serena Williams won 14 majors in that time.

SHAPIRO: And Venus Williams has won some, too. Plus there are other U.S. women who have gone to semis since 2009.

MCEVERS: After hearing Murray's comments, Serena Williams told ESPN she wasn't surprised. She said he has spoken up for women's issues and women's rights, especially in tennis, for forever. He does it again.

SHAPIRO: And his mom, Judy Murray, tweeted, that's my boy. Then she typed a heart emoji.

[POST-BROADCAST CORRECTION: A headline on a previous version of this transcript misspelled Andy Murray's last name as Andy Murrary.]

(SOUNDBITE OF REAL ESTATE SONG, "DARLING")

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Correction July 15, 2017

A headline on a previous version of this story misspelled Andy Murray's last name as Murrary.