People Travel Across The Country To Get A Glimpse Of The Solar Eclipse Americans are traveling to cities, towns and campsites across the country to get a good view of the Great American Eclipse. All Things Considered heard from a few of them as they witnessed eclipse in totality.
NPR logo

People Travel Across The Country To Get A Glimpse Of The Solar Eclipse

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/545071307/545071311" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
People Travel Across The Country To Get A Glimpse Of The Solar Eclipse

People Travel Across The Country To Get A Glimpse Of The Solar Eclipse

People Travel Across The Country To Get A Glimpse Of The Solar Eclipse

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/545071307/545071311" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Americans are traveling to cities, towns and campsites across the country to get a good view of the Great American Eclipse. All Things Considered heard from a few of them as they witnessed eclipse in totality.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Americans gathered in cities, towns and remote campsites across the country today to witness the Great American Eclipse, among them many NPR listeners, including a few who kept a sort of audio diary of the moment of totality, the moment the moon passed directly in front of the sun.

AMANDA BENTLEY BRYMER: Greetings from Cottontown, Tenn. My name is Amanda Bentley Brymer (ph), and right now I am staring up at this sliver of sun. I can really sense the difference. It's not like a cloud passing over.

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: Wow, it's gone from dusk...

BRYMER: (Laughter).

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: ...To night. Holy Moses.

BRYMER: (Laughter) Oh, my gosh.

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: Oh, my God.

BRYMER: I am shaking. You know, the whole reason we're here was just to press reset. This moment - I thought it would feel longer. And now it feels like it's 4 o'clock in the afternoon again.

(SOUNDBITE OF KATE SIMKO'S "THE CREATIVE PART")

Copyright © 2017 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.