Publicly Admit You're Fired And Get A Free Burger Burger King says if you publicly admit on LinkedIn that you've been fired, you'll get a free burger. They're calling it "Whopper Severance."
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Publicly Admit You're Fired And Get A Free Burger

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Publicly Admit You're Fired And Get A Free Burger

Publicly Admit You're Fired And Get A Free Burger

Publicly Admit You're Fired And Get A Free Burger

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/547774607/547774608" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Burger King says if you publicly admit on LinkedIn that you've been fired, you'll get a free burger. They're calling it "Whopper Severance."

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Rachel Martin. OK. Nobody wants to get fired. It is not a nice feeling. All the self-doubt eating away at you can leave a huge pit in your stomach. Well, the crack marketing team at Burger King wants to fill that pit of despair with flame-broiled food. Here's the deal - a free burger for anyone who admits on LinkedIn that they got canned. The company calls it Whopper Severance. Public humiliation for a hamburger? So what calamity do you have to suffer for a side of fries? It's MORNING EDITION.

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