It's Getting (Dangerously) Hot in Herre : Code Switch On this week's episode we talk about why certain communities are more vulnerable to catastrophic weather events like hurricanes and heat waves. Saying "mother nature doesn't discriminate," ignores the fact that discrimination exacerbates her wrath.
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It's Getting (Dangerously) Hot in Herre

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It's Getting (Dangerously) Hot in Herre

It's Getting (Dangerously) Hot in Herre

It's Getting (Dangerously) Hot in Herre

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/550452204/550561079" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

On this week's episode we talk about why certain communities are more vulnerable to catastrophic weather events like hurricanes and heat waves. Saying "mother nature doesn't discriminate," ignores the fact that discrimination exacerbates her wrath.

Amy Gonzalez lives in the hottest part of Los Angeles, where average temperatures are rising. Molly Peterson for NPR hide caption

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Molly Peterson for NPR

Amy Gonzalez lives in the hottest part of Los Angeles, where average temperatures are rising.

Molly Peterson for NPR