Edible Arrangements: Tariq Farid When Tariq Farid was 12, he emigrated from Pakistan to the U.S. – and quickly found a job at a local flower shop. Eventually he opened his own shop, which eventually led to the crazy idea to make flower bouquets out of fruit. Edible Arrangements has now bloomed into a franchise of nearly 1300 locations with an annual revenue of $600 million. PLUS in our postscript "How You Built That," how the Seattle-based clothing company, Five12, is making athletic wear out of used coffee grounds.
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Edible Arrangements: Tariq Farid

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Edible Arrangements: Tariq Farid

Edible Arrangements: Tariq Farid

Edible Arrangements: Tariq Farid

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/543035665/544419379" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

When Tariq Farid was 12, he emigrated from Pakistan to the U.S. – and quickly found a job at a local flower shop. Eventually he opened his own shop, which eventually led to the crazy idea to make flower bouquets out of fruit. Edible Arrangements has now bloomed into a franchise of nearly 1300 locations with an annual revenue of $600 million. PLUS in our postscript "How You Built That," how the Seattle-based clothing company, Five12, is making athletic wear out of used coffee grounds.

Angie Wang for NPR
Tariq Farid, founder and CEO of Edible Arrangements.
Angie Wang for NPR