Albert Einstein's Quote About Living A Modest Life Sells For $1.3 Million Albert Einstein wrote: "A calm and modest life brings more happiness than the pursuit of success combined with constant restlessness." His quote on a piece of paper sold for $1.3 million.
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Albert Einstein's Quote About Living A Modest Life Sells For $1.3 Million

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Albert Einstein's Quote About Living A Modest Life Sells For $1.3 Million

Albert Einstein's Quote About Living A Modest Life Sells For $1.3 Million

Albert Einstein's Quote About Living A Modest Life Sells For $1.3 Million

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/559963919/559963920" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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Albert Einstein wrote: "A calm and modest life brings more happiness than the pursuit of success combined with constant restlessness." His quote on a piece of paper sold for $1.3 million.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep. Somebody did buy happiness. Albert Einstein's theory of happiness sold at auction. Someone paid $1.3 million for a piece of paper. On it Einstein wrote, a calm and modest life brings more happiness than the pursuit of success. He wrote this in 1922 just as he learned of his Nobel Prize in physics. He didn't have money to tip a bellboy so he wrote that advice instead. We don't know what the bellboy thought. It's MORNING EDITION.

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