Lawmaker Who Backed Ore. Cellphone Law Gets Caught Breaking It Under a new law in Oregon, you're not allowed to hold your phone while driving. State Rep. Julie Parrish supported the bill — and was pulled over for violating the new law. She faces a $265 fine.
NPR logo

Lawmaker Who Backed Ore. Cellphone Law Gets Caught Breaking It

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/561041272/561041273" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Lawmaker Who Backed Ore. Cellphone Law Gets Caught Breaking It

Law

Lawmaker Who Backed Ore. Cellphone Law Gets Caught Breaking It

Lawmaker Who Backed Ore. Cellphone Law Gets Caught Breaking It

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/561041272/561041273" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Under a new law in Oregon, you're not allowed to hold your phone while driving. State Rep. Julie Parrish supported the bill — and was pulled over for violating the new law. She faces a $265 fine.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm David Greene. Under a new law in Oregon, you are not allowed to hold your phone while driving. State Representative Julie Parrish supported that bill. In related news, State Representative Julie Parrish was driving the other day. KATU TV reports she was pulled over for violating a new cellphone law. She now faces a $265 fine. KATU broke the story because Parrish was looking at her phone for directions to KATU, where she had an interview scheduled. You're listening to MORNING EDITION.

Copyright © 2017 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.