Stores: Stop Torturing Your Employees With Christmas Music Psychologist Linda Blair said workers are less productive when stores play Christmas music nonstop. "You're simply spending all your energy trying not to hear what you're hearing," she told Sky News.
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Stores: Stop Torturing Your Employees With Christmas Music

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Stores: Stop Torturing Your Employees With Christmas Music

Stores: Stop Torturing Your Employees With Christmas Music

Stores: Stop Torturing Your Employees With Christmas Music

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Psychologist Linda Blair said workers are less productive when stores play Christmas music nonstop. "You're simply spending all your energy trying not to hear what you're hearing," she told Sky News.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm David Greene with something you don't want to hear in early November.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "HERE COMES SANTA CLAUS")

ALVIN AND THE CHIPMUNKS: (Singing) Here comes Santa Claus. Here comes Santa Claus right down Santa Claus Lane.

GREENE: Apologies, but I do torture you with the best intentions.

To report on how Christmas music makes you less productive, psychologist Linda Blair said store employees are really at risk.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

LINDA BLAIR: You simply are spending all your energy trying not to hear what you're hearing.

GREENE: I love the music Sky News chose for this story. It's MORNING EDITION.

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