Follow Your Dreams: Man Takes Disneyland Ride 10,000 Times A California man committed to riding a car ride at Disneyland 10,000 times after getting gastric bypass surgery. It took 760 visits and more than five years.
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Follow Your Dreams: Man Takes Disneyland Ride 10,000 Times

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Follow Your Dreams: Man Takes Disneyland Ride 10,000 Times

Follow Your Dreams: Man Takes Disneyland Ride 10,000 Times

Follow Your Dreams: Man Takes Disneyland Ride 10,000 Times

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/564272255/564272256" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A California man committed to riding a car ride at Disneyland 10,000 times after getting gastric bypass surgery. It took 760 visits and more than five years.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Rachel Martin. Can loving Disneyland help you lose weight? It's a stretch, but Disney fandom definitely helped one California man keep the weight off. After getting gastric bypass surgery, John Hale committed to ride the Pixar "Cars" attraction 10,000 times. He said all the walking involved with the ride and the motivation to be able to fit his body inside the cars kept him on track. It took him five years and 760 visits to the park, but Hale met the 10,000 ride mark.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "LIFE IS A HIGHWAY")

RASCAL FLATTS: (Singing) Life is a highway. I want to ride it all night long.

MARTIN: It's MORNING EDITION.

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