Listeners Share The Music They're Grateful For On Thursday, NPR's Ari Shapiro shared his annual Thanksgiving musical chain of gratitude. We had so many listeners reach out with their own musical thanks, that we decided to share a few of them on the air.

Listeners Share The Music They're Grateful For

Listeners Share The Music They're Grateful For

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On Thursday, NPR's Ari Shapiro shared his annual Thanksgiving musical chain of gratitude. We had so many listeners reach out with their own musical thanks, that we decided to share a few of them on the air.

ELISE HU, HOST:

Yesterday on the program we aired our annual Thanksgiving musical chain of gratitude.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "I'M EVERY WOMAN")

CHAKA KHAN: (Singing) I'm every woman. It's all in me.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

I spoke with four different artists about a musician that each of them is grateful for. And now it's your turn. We asked you to tell us about the music that you return to, that lifts you up, that you are just glad is in this world.

HU: @Missystanisz wrote us on Twitter to say she's grateful for "Wherever Is Your Heart" by Brandi Carlile.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "WHEREVER IS YOUR HEART")

BRANDI CARLILE: (Singing) Wherever is your heart I call home.

HU: She said the song is about what really matters in this life, hashtag love. Shawn Stingel in Washington, D.C. left us this message.

SHAWN STINGEL: So I'm grateful for the song "Beautiful Trauma" by Pink.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "BEAUTIFUL TRAUMA")

PINK: (Singing) 'Cause I've been on the run so long they can't find me. You're waking up to remember I'm pretty.

STINGEL: And I just recently saw the video featuring Channing Tatum. And the two of them are flip-flopping roles, and they're dancing together. I just thought it was a very happy video. And I grew up listening to her. So that's why I'm thankful for that song.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "BEAUTIFUL TRAUMA")

PINK: (Singing) Beautiful trauma. My love, my love, my drug. My love...

SHAPIRO: Finally, Joshua Baker from Portland, Ore., wrote to say, I'm thankful for the local legacy of Dead Moon and the powerful music duo Fred and Toody Cole. Fred Cole died earlier this month. But Baker says even with Fred gone, he's trying to remember what the Dead Moon song says - it's OK.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "IT'S OK")

DEAD MOON: (Singing) It's OK. Oh, it's OK. OK, OK, OK. It's OK.

HU: Whatever song you're grateful for, keep it playing. And thanks for listening.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "IT'S OK")

DEAD MOON: (Singing) It's OK. It's OK. We love you anyway. It's OK. Yeah, it's OK. We love you anyway. It's OK. Oh, it's OK. We love you anyway. It's OK. Yeah, it's OK. Oh, we love you anyway.

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