Teach For America: Wendy Kopp In 1989, college senior Wendy Kopp was trying to figure out how to improve American public schools. For her senior thesis, she proposed creating a national teaching corps that would recruit recent college grads to teach in underserved schools. One year later, she launched the nonprofit, Teach for America. Today, TFA has 50,000 alumni, a budget of nearly $300 million, and continues to place thousands of teachers across the country. PLUS in our postscript "How You Built That," how a game of Secret Santa led Chris Waters to create Constructed Adventures, elaborate scavenger hunts for all occasions.
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Teach For America: Wendy Kopp

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Teach For America: Wendy Kopp

Teach For America: Wendy Kopp

Teach For America: Wendy Kopp

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/556177643/556245867" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

In 1989, college senior Wendy Kopp was trying to figure out how to improve American public schools. For her senior thesis, she proposed creating a national teaching corps that would recruit recent college grads to teach in underserved schools. One year later, she launched the nonprofit, Teach for America. Today, TFA has 50,000 alumni, a budget of nearly $300 million, and continues to place thousands of teachers across the country. PLUS in our postscript "How You Built That," how a game of Secret Santa led Chris Waters to create Constructed Adventures, elaborate scavenger hunts for all occasions.

Wendy Kopp, founder of Teach For America Connor Heckert for NPR hide caption

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Connor Heckert for NPR

Wendy Kopp, founder of Teach For America

Connor Heckert for NPR