TSA Bomb-Sniffing Dog Leaves Her Mark At Chicago Airport A dog working security at Chicago's Midway airport is skittish around crowds. Authorities there are being patient as she nervously dirties the terminal.
NPR logo

TSA Bomb-Sniffing Dog Leaves Her Mark At Chicago Airport

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/571305339/571305340" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
TSA Bomb-Sniffing Dog Leaves Her Mark At Chicago Airport

TSA Bomb-Sniffing Dog Leaves Her Mark At Chicago Airport

TSA Bomb-Sniffing Dog Leaves Her Mark At Chicago Airport

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/571305339/571305340" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A dog working security at Chicago's Midway airport is skittish around crowds. Authorities there are being patient as she nervously dirties the terminal.

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

So there's a dog working shifts for the Transportation Security Administration at Chicago's Midway Airport who is leaving her mark on holiday air travel. She's a 2-year-old German Shepherd. The TSA doesn't reveal names, so travelers can't distract the dogs as she sniffs. And she sniffs for bombs. But the dog is still so skittish around crowds after four months at work that she reportedly relieves herself in the concourses and terminals. Well, who hasn't felt that way in a crowded airport?

Kevin McCarthy, who heads up the TSA at Midway, says that they will work with the dog until she can calm down. It's not going to ruin her career, he told the Chicago Sun-Times. It doesn't impact her ability to do the job. So by all means, fly the friendly skies. Just watch where you step.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

Copyright © 2017 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.