Sunday Puzzle: Initially, You Might Be Right, But It's Time To Switch It Up New York Times crossword editor and Weekend Edition Puzzlemaster Will Shortz presents this week's puzzle to Kevin Devine of Marlborough, Mass., and NPR's Lauren Frayer.
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Sunday Puzzle: Initially, You Might Be Right, But It's Time To Switch It Up

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Sunday Puzzle: Initially, You Might Be Right, But It's Time To Switch It Up

Sunday Puzzle: Initially, You Might Be Right, But It's Time To Switch It Up

Sunday Puzzle: Initially, You Might Be Right, But It's Time To Switch It Up

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/572833897/573275537" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Sunday Puzzle. NPR hide caption

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Sunday Puzzle.

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On-air challenge: NPR stands for National Public Radio, of course. But the letters N-P-R are also the initials of "nail polish remover." I'm going to give you clues to some other three-word names and phrases whose initials stand for better-known things.

1. I.C.C. (Interstate Commerce Commission) — Basic purchase at Dairy Queen
2. S.L.R. (Single-Lens Reflex) — Waterway past Montreal and Quebec
3. N.F.L. (National Football League) — Principle that an object at rest stays at rest unless acted upon
4. B.B.C. (British Broadcasting Corporaton) — Noted Wild West showman
5. J.F.K. (John Fitzgerald Kennedy) — Not with any serious purpose in mind
6. D.D.S. (Doctor of dental surgery) — Means of classification of library books
7. F.T.C. (Federal Trade Commission) — Something you're said to search with if you do a very careful search
8. B.F.F. (Best friends forever) — Event for cinephiles in Germany
9. L.C.D. (Light-emitting diode or lowest common denominator) — Rimsky-Korsakov opera whose French title translates as "The Golden Cockerel"
10. N.B.C. (National Broadcasting Company) — Evening of December 24

Last week's challenge: This challenge came from listener Neville Fogarty of Newport News, Va. Think of a convenience introduced in the 19th century that is still around today. Its name has two words. Take the first three letters of the first word and the first letter of its second word, in order, to get a convenience introduced in the 21st century that serves a similar purpose. Their names are otherwise unrelated. What two conveniences are these?

Answer: Yellow Pages --> Yelp

Winner: Kevin Devine of Marlborough, Mass.

Next week's challenge: The name of what well-known U.S. city, in 10 letters, contains only three different letters of the alphabet?

Submit Your Answer

If you know the answer to next week's challenge, submit it here. Listeners who submit correct answers win a chance to play the on-air puzzle. Important: Include a phone number where we can reach you Thursday, Dec. 28 at 3 p.m. ET.