Slingshot: Public Radio's Favorite New Artists Of 2018 In 2018, Slingshot welcomes 20 up-and-coming artists, hand-picked by NPR Music and partner stations around the country.
NPR logo Meet The 2018 Slingshot Artists

Meet The 2018 Slingshot Artists

NPR Music welcomes 20 new artists to Slingshot, a collective effort among taste-making music stations to introduce exceptional emerging artists. Keep an eye out for new additions throughout the year.

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Air Credits

Hip-hop bangers with electric beats tell stories of a dystopian future.

J. Frank Visuals/Courtesy of the artist
Air Credits
J. Frank Visuals/Courtesy of the artist

Goes well with: long treks through empty, desolate landscapes in search of provisions and clean air packs; soothing anxiety about the potential collapse of our civilization

Should open for: Deltron 3030, Divine Styler

Air Credits is a futuristic hip-hop project of Chicago rapper ShowYouSuck and producer STV SLV (aka Steve Reidell) of The Hood Internet.

Air Credits' most recent release, Omega Virus, is a follow-up to 2016's Broadcasted, itself a concept mixtape which imagines a dystopian post-war future where scarce natural resources are controlled by corporations, and the remnants of the old world can be remembered only through lingering broadcast signals of abandoned radio stations. Omega Virus is a prequel to Broadcasted, and offers a backstory to how we arrived at the end of the world as we know it. The story is told by an unassuming narrator, ShowYouSuck, who has built a cult-like following as the city's Dude Bro, with high-energy raps about pizza, retro video games and Slurpees. On Omega Virus, he leads a Dude Bro renaissance, asking questions like "What happened to the net? What happened to the water? All we want is answers, but all they give us is cancers."

Backed up by STV SLV's synth-based production, Air Credits portrays the sound of the future as an amalgam of the distinct sounds of ShowYouSuck and The Hood Internet: hip-hop bangers with electric beats.

Fyodor Sakhnovski, Vocalo

YouTube

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Bedouine

Country music and Laurel Canyon folk fuse with delicate finger-picking and a smooth, soothing voice.

Polly Antonia Barrowman/Courtesy of the artist
Bedouine
Polly Antonia Barrowman/Courtesy of the artist

Goes well with: a drive through mountain roads, sitting by a crackling fire on a rainy night

Should open for: Laura Marling

The Bedouin are a nomadic group of people of the Middle Eastern deserts. Though not technically Bedouin, Azniv Korkejian, who records as Bedouine, began her life in Syria and Saudi Arabia, before her Armenian parents won a Green Card lottery and moved to the United States. After landing in Boston, then Houston, Korkejian followed her artistic pursuits to Echo Park in Los Angeles, where (following more stops in the American South) she developed a kinship with musicians who would help realize her sound. In particular, bassist/producer Gus Seyffert played a central role in shaping what would become Bedouine's gorgeous and confident self-titled debut, with finishing touches of orchestral arrangements provided by Trey Pollard of Spacebomb, Matthew E. White's label and studios in Richmond, Va.

Hints of Southern country music and the soft, rustic folk of '70s-era Laurel Canyon fuse with delicate finger-picking and Bedouine's smooth, soothing voice. Her poetic lyrics showcase reflections on love, solitude and the freedom that comes from self-knowledge. Though her songs may have touchstones from the past, her wanderings and wisdom carry a female perspective that feels uniquely modern. In the album standout "Solitary Daughter," Korkejian states: "I don't want your pity, concern, or your scorn / I'm calm by my lonesome, I feel right at home." For someone who has called so many places home, finding solace within is the greatest reward.

Carmel Holt, WFUV

YouTube

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Brent Cowles

His father was a preacher who swayed him to the spiritual side of music; his own sound mines high-energy, thoughtful rock 'n' roll.

Brent Cowles
Brent Cowles
Brent Cowles

Goes well with: a Friday afternoon when you don't want to work

Should open for: Avett Brothers, Alabama Shakes

Brent Cowles is one of those musicians you can't help but root for. After achieving minor success with the band You, Me & Apollo, Cowles decided to stretch his wings and begin his solo career. His music has developed into a hybrid of blues, soul, rock and pop.

That blend of styles is a result of his upbringing in Colorado Springs, Co. His father was a preacher who swayed Cowles towards the spiritual side of music, but also encouraged him to explore as many genres as possible. The result is an original sound based on the classic tradition of high-energy, thoughtful rock 'n' roll.

Cowles has just signed with Dine Alone records. Expect his debut full-length album to arrive in the spring of 2018.

Benji McPhail, The Colorado Sound

YouTube

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George Li

With a 1,000-watt smile and warm-hearted performances, the 22-year-old pianist is proof that classical music can drop the pretense and kick some butt.

Simon Fowler/Courtesy of the artist
George Li
Simon Fowler/Courtesy of the artist

Goes well with: sunshine and champagne; free-spirited dancing; short-term goal planning

Should open for: Roomful of Teeth, yMusic, Brooklyn Rider, So Percussion, Orpheus Chamber Orchestra

The young American pianist George Li has a winning smile that can light up a room — or better yet, a concert hall, like the famed Mariinsky in St. Petersburg, Russia, where his debut recital album was recorded. Little George was only 10 years old when he made his public debut. These days, the 22-year-old Massachusetts native's career continues to blossom since capturing the silver medal at the 2015 International Tchaikovsky Competition. He remembers it as being "like the musical Olympics."

Li has a busy performance schedule, but there's still time for college and sports. He takes literature courses at Harvard while studying piano privately and, living in Boston, he's a huge Red Sox fan. At the keyboard, his Haydn sparkles, his Chopin is passionate and he plays blockbusters, like Liszt's "Hungarian Rhapsody No. 2," with the heart-on-sleeve swagger of the old-school masters like Vladimir Horowitz.

Tom Huizenga, NPR Music

YouTube

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Gracie and Rachel

A study in contrasts: Two California high school friends now living and writing together in NYC mix pop and classical in stark, infectious ways.

Gracie and Rachel
Aysia Marotta/Courtesy of the artist

Goes well with: a good bottle of wine and some spicy Thai food

Should open for: The Beatles

On hearing "Only A Child" by Gracie and Rachel, I knew I had found a musical soulmate. I quickly premiered a video of the song, invited them to play a Tiny Desk Concert, put on a house show with them and put this talented duo in my Top 10 Albums Of 2017. Gracie Coates and Rachel Ruggles are a duo with contrasts, Gracie with a pop sensibility on keyboards and vocals and Rachel with her textured, classical-leaning violin sounds.

Together they made a debut record they call "a giant note to self to quit suppressing anxiety and start celebrating it for the beauty it can be in you." And they say that "we're all just children" with a need to be "more forgiving and at peace." Gracie and Rachel make unforgettable, surprising music.

Bob Boilen, NPR Music

YouTube

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Haley Heynderickx

One of Portland's most intriguing new songwriters, her songs combine small observational details, delivered in a guileless voice.

Vincent Bancheri/Courtesy of the artist
Haley Heynderickx
Vincent Bancheri/Courtesy of the artist

Goes well with: watching the clouds in a field of dandelions, a Tim Burton movie, a Moscow mule

Should open for: Sharon Van Etten

Haley Heynderickx needs to start a garden. As one of Portland, Ore.'s most intriguing new songwriters, she's been attracting notice for her live shows for several years. Her songs often combine small observational details, delivered in a guileless voice. So far, she's released two EPs: Fish Eyes (2016) and The Bug Collector (2017). The title song of The Bug Collector catalogs the various crawlies — on the wall, the window, the bathtub — that she has to vanquish to "make you the perfect morning." Her song "Sane" paints a more unsettled picture, with its flattened guitar lines and chorus declaring that "the look in your eyes kept me sane."

Heynderickx jokingly calls her music "doom folk." Her latest song "Oom Sha La La," written for a songwriting challenge, is an earworm with a singalong doo-wop chorus, silly lyrics and a surprising freakout in the middle about her horticultural obligations. It appears on (and gives a title to) her debut album I Need To Start A Garden, to be released early this year.

David Christensen, opbmusic

YouTube

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Hello June

Bright, blissful indie rock that shimmers, even throughout its darker moments.

Hello June
Josh Saul/Courtesy of the artist

Goes well with: a tequila sunrise or a PBR; the brightest of city lights; a long, windy country road under a supermoon

Should open for: U2 (seriously), Beach House, The Kills, Modest Mouse

Hello June developed its danceable indie-rock sound in the nurturing arms of Morgantown, W.V., where the trio of singer and guitarist Sarah Rudy, drummer Whit Alexander and guitarist Chad Brown first made music together.

Their six-song EP Spruce, released in June 2017, displays their blend of bright, blissful rock that shimmers, even throughout its darker moments. Spruce welcomes listeners in the washy, sustained tones of "Time," which has a refrain built to linger in your conscience. The EP waves goodbye with the languid, hushed, slow build of "Colors."

Sarah Rudy makes everything count — each sustained chord, each riff, and most impactfully, those passages where there's no playing at all — and it all works to support the cathartic ebbs and flows. Their knack for a memorable hook is prevalent in "Dance," from the undeniable opening jaunt to the refined (yet dingy) star-gazing introspection.

Adam Harris, Mountain Stage

YouTube

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Hembree

Isaac Flynn's bandmates asked who was singing on one of his early bedroom demos, not recognizing the voice of the friend they'd played with for years.

Hembree
Stephen Shireman/Courtesy of the artist

Goes well with: an outdoor deck at a craft brewery, breaking the speed limit on the Interstate, a dog park on Saturday afternoon

Should open for: Beck, Local Natives, Portugal. The Man

Hembree's principal songwriter and frontman Isaac Flynn grew up with a studio in his basement — his father played guitar for Martina McBride during her pre-country, Midwestern rock club beginnings. So it makes sense that Hembree's EP begins with recordings made in the bedroom of Flynn's downtown Kansas City loft. Many of those demos survived as the foundations for Had It All, produced by Eric Hillman (Foreign Fields) and mixed by Joe Visciano (The Kills, Jamie xx, Beck).

Bandmates Eric Davis (keyboards) and Garrett Childers (vocals, guitar) joined Flynn in Hembree when their previous group, Quiet Corral, disbanded. Flynn had never been the lead vocalist in a band, but that changed when his bandmates asked who was singing on one of his early bedroom demos, not recognizing the voice of the friend they'd played with for years.

Now nearing a million Spotify streams of Had It All's "Holy Water," Hembree has opened for Elvis Costello, The Cold War Kids and Phoenix. They're scheduled for a SXSW official showcase in the spring. More tour dates and a new single are coming early in 2018, with a full album slated for later in the year.

Jon Hart, The Bridge

YouTube

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The Hogan Brothers

The Bay Area siblings join the resurgence of 1970s fusion with a mix of electric instruments, Latin jazz and wisps of hip-hop.

The Hogan Brothers
Courtesy of the artist

Goes well with: easy grooving, tapping your foot, dancing as if no one is watching

Should open for: Herbie Hancock, Chick Corea, Snarky Puppy, Thundercat

In the 1970s, many of the young lions of jazz plugged in their instruments and turned up the volume. Herbie Hancock, Chick Corea and John McLaughlin were all alumni of Miles Davis' groundbreaking electric bands who went on to create a subgenre that has been having a popular resurgence in the 21st century. Bands like Snarky Puppy hark back to the sounds of their predecessors while incorporating the influence of hip-hop.

The Hogan Brothers (Colin on keyboards, Steve on bass and Julian on drums) fall right in step with other bands expanding the sound of jazz these days. The defining characteristic of this music is an unbridled sense of exploration; this family band draws on unspoken communication to perform original compositions that sound at times both familiar and completely new. Deep grooves and prodigious chops make it all look and sound effortless.

The Hogan Brothers are absolutely a band deserving much wider recognition.

- Felix Contreras, NPR Music

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Jade Bird

The 20-year-old U.K. singer-songwriter schooled herself in traditional American blues and cry-in-your-whiskey honky-tonk.

Jade Bird
Francesca Allen/Courtesy of the artist

Goes well with: your next road trip, whether it's on Route 66 or the M6

Should open for: John Paul White, Shelby Lynne, Jack White, Mumford & Sons.

The year 2017 was a giddy ride for Jade Bird, the 20-year-old U.K. singer-songwriter well-deserving of the buzz generated in the wake of her debut EP Something American. From SXSW to the hallowed studios of Woodstock and Nashville, she's already been tagged as one of Rolling Stone's 10 New Country Artists You Need To Know, and just recently was long-listed for the BBC's Sound of 2018 prize, whose previous honorees include Adele, Michael Kiwanuka and Haim.

Having honed her craft from an early age — schooling herself in traditional American blues and cry-in-your-whiskey honky-tonk — she won herself a whole new legion of stateside fans on her recent tour, thanks to lyrical musings beyond her years and a knack for charming audiences into putting away their phones.

Bird undoubtedly will be selling out venues on her next U.S. jaunt (slated for this spring). With a new batch of new tunes, collaborations and TV appearances on the horizon, she's set herself up for a big 2018.

Gini Mascorro, KXT

YouTube

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Knox Fortune

The producer heard on Chance the Rapper's "All Night" steps to the mic on songs that epitomize youth.

Courtesy of the artist
Knox Fortune
Courtesy of the artist

Goes well with: your hangover, impressing first dates, feeling warm during winter

Should open for: BØRNS, Solange

Known mostly for his production skills, most of us first noticed Knox Fortune when he came out from behind the boards on the chorus of fellow Chicagoan Chance the Rapper's mega-hit "All Night." Thankfully, we're getting more from Knox Fortune (real name Kevin Rhomberg) in front of the mic on his latest album, Paradise. These breezy tunes, paired with his inventive production style, make for catchy earworms that might catapult (dare I say slingshot) him to ubiquity.

It's not always easy for a production-centered musician to make music that sounds organic, but Rhomberg pulls it off. His are songs that make you feel youth. Maybe it's your own in the rearview mirror, or a reminder that there are a whole bunch of people younger than you with dreams, aspirations and disposable time.

Matt Reilly, KUTX

YouTube

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Lawrence Rothman

The genderfluid artist reflects several different personas on their meticulously-produced debut album.

Lawrence Rothman's alter ego, Kevin.
Floria Sigismondi/Courtesy of the artist

Goes well with: morning shower karaoke

Should open for: The Cure

"Come let me adore you / Adore your imperfections": That's the lyric that first caught my attention, a piercing line from "Wolves Still Cry" that seemed to navigate the most intimate of spaces. Intrigued enough to search online for Lawrence Rothman, images came up of a handsome yet battered face — swollen eye, busted lip. It was all quite strange, but I found myself drawn to it.

Rothman is a genderfluid artist, reflecting several personas through songs on their debut album, The Book Of Law. With meticulous production, interesting guests and creative affiliations, and a knack for slick pop songwriting, the album captivated me from beginning to end.

With its '80s power-pop sensibility, "Wolves Still Cry" remains a favorite from the album. But there's enough of a vision here for this emerging artist to be one to watch in the year ahead.

Jason Bentley, KCRW

YouTube

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Liz Brasher

She shouts, rocks, rolls and tears it up on stage; her music will dig down deep to touch your soul.

Liz Brasher
Courtesy of the artist

Goes well with: blasting the speakers on a dinner cruise around NYC, a loft house party on a Saturday night, a NOLA second line

Should open for: Bettye LaVette, Justin Timberlake, The Mavericks

Liz Brasher is a newly-minted, Good-God-Hallelujah, shining example of the great American melting pot. Born in North Carolina to parents of Dominican heritage, the blues, soul and gospel are steeped deep within her. She currently lives in Memphis, and the city's rich musical heritage — namely, Stax and Sun Records — also informs her brand of R&B. Brasher (rhymes with Frazer) shouts, rocks, rolls, and tears it up on stage; her music will dig down deep to touch your soul.

Brasher will release her debut album this year. Her early single "Body Of Mine" recalls the girl-group thing, but somehow feels totally contemporary, too — it delivers power and frailty in equal measure.

Jessie Scott, WMOT

YouTube

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McKinley Dixon

"What I've learned is that you can always fly / Even on your back you can see the sky."

McKinley Dixon
Courtesy of the artist

Goes well with: Ta-Nehisi Coates' coming-of-age memoir The Beautiful Struggle

Should open for: Oddisee, Anderson .Paak, Kamasi Washington, BadBadNotGood

A self-described "angry black boy who's lucky enough to talk about it," McKinley Dixon found his voice through rap. The Richmond native's debut mixtape, 2016's Who Taught You To Hate Yourself?, tells the story of a young boy inundated by the harsh realities of police brutality, gang violence and self-hatred after witnessing a drive-by murder in his neighborhood. It's a fictionalized tale reflective of a particular kind of black experience. Dixon's own coming of age was marked by an identity crisis of a different sort. The dissociation he experienced growing up black in a primarily-white environment caused him to distance himself from hip-hop until he came to terms with internalized racism.

Dixon reflects that angst and anger, but also the hope of a young man trying to hone a sense of pride that contradicts messages to the contrary. "Story of a little black boy with his nose all runny / trying to shoot for the stars like them n——- owe him money," he raps on "Sitting On Wire." Rooted in the jazz-rap tradition, his musical journey is equally ambitious. With the help of 20 musicians, he recorded his first mixtape in his bedroom. But it's Dixon's forthcoming mixtape, The Importance Of Self Belief (due in March), that showcases his maturation. On that second installation in his planned trilogy, he plans to continue his quest with an added emphasis on "uplift[ing] voices of black women, femme and trans femme," he says, "whether in my life or outside of it."

Rodney Carmichael, NPR Music

YouTube

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Mt. Joy

Old-school classic rock blends with Americana in well-crafted songs that drip with nostalgia.

Mt. Joy
Courtesy of the artist

Goes well with: summer festivals, psychedelic sunsets, soundboard bootlegs

Should open for: Of Monsters and Men, Michael Kiwanuka, My Morning Jacket

The founding members of Philly-raised, L.A.-based Mt. Joy — Matt Quinn (vocals/guitar) and Sam Cooper (guitar) — have been making music since the early 2000s. But it wasn't until 2016 when the two came together and began to write songs that would become the foundation of their recently-released EP. Something clearly clicked: Early singles "Astrovan" and "Sheep" have each surpassed 4 million streams on Spotify.

Hearing Mt. Joy for the first time reminded me of the first time I heard August And Everything After by Counting Crows. Like the Crows' debut, Mt. Joy brings together elements of old-school classic rock and Americana with well-crafted songs that drip with nostalgia, and lots of well-placed singalong moments. Quinn is an emotionally powerful singer whose phrasing is filled with yearning and longing yet offers plenty of redemption.

Look for their debut full-length on Dualtone Records mid-winter.

Bruce Warren, WXPN

YouTube

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Phoebe Bridgers

Deadpan humor and eloquently-selected puns color songs which cut deep and weigh heavy.

Phoebe Bridgers
Frank Ockenfels/Courtesy of the artist

Goes well with: a meditative, introspective place; public transportation; a Catcher In The Rye re-read

Should open for: Aimee Mann, First Aid Kit, St. Vincent, Leonard Cohen

Singer-songwriter Phoebe Bridgers began writing songs at a young age, playing them at open mics and farmers markets in Los Angeles. At age 23 she released her debut album, Stranger In The Alps, conveying dark and introspective narratives from personal experience. Her vocal inflections power astute observational lyrics that cut deep and weigh heavy.

Deadpan humor and even eloquently-selected puns occasionally lighten the bleakness. The lyrics pull from meditations on the many moments that make up our lives. Take the line in her single about having "emotional motion sickness": "Why do you sing with an English accent? I guess it's too late to change it now."

When these small observations are paired with her stunning vocal abilities, Bridgers forces listeners, song by song, to empathize with all that she conveys.

Nick Acquisto, KDHX

YouTube

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The Shacks

Barely in their 20s, Shannon Wise and Max Shrager make music that transports you to a simpler time.

The Shacks
Sesse Lind/Courtesy of the artist

Goes well with: a cold winter day sipping hot cocoa in front of a warm fire, a chill playlist at a slumber party

Should open for: Chicano Batman (already happened), The xx, MGMT, Spoon

The self-titled debut EP from New York City's The Shacks feels like floating in a delicious dream — you can almost feel Shannon Wise's mesmerizing voice whispering directly into your ear.

Despite being barely in their 20s, their music has a way of transporting you to a simpler time. The Shacks have been compared to Mazzy Star, Jesus and Mary Chain and Broadcast, a testement to the band's timeless, multi-generational warmth. Their songs would be as comfortable next to an Elvis Presley track in the '60s as they are next to Coldplay today. The Shacks' music is fresh, yet familiar; intimate, yet friendly.

The Shacks EP opens with "This Strange Effect," written by Ray Davies and originally recorded by Dave Berry in 1965; Wise sings it as if it were written for her. Apple chose it as their featured song in the iPhone 8 commercial and Wise as its star. Wise and Shrager are putting the finishing touches on their first full-length record Haze, forthcoming from Big Crown Records.

Willobee Carlan, NV89

YouTube

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Sidney Gish

"I try not to think too hard and just make what I'd be interested in listening to."

Sidney Gish Andrea Wolanin/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

toggle caption
Andrea Wolanin/Courtesy of the artist

Goes well with: a mug of hot chocolate and a good book on a rainy day

Should open for: Charly Bliss

Sidney Gish is a singer-songwriter and full-time student in Boston. She's been recording and releasing her own work since 2015, and she released her first album, Ed Buys Houses, in December 2016. It was met with praise for its melodic hooks and inventive subject matter.

But Gish doesn't let the positive reviews go to her head. "I try not to think too hard and just make what I'd be interested in listening to," she says. "That changes with time. I think some of the stuff I've made is kind of hyper now, but seeing someone who's the age I was when I made it enjoying it makes me really glad I made it anyway."

Her sound and brand are all homemade, and she takes pride in her "learn as you go" approach. And she's determined to keep control over her music. Gish also makes her own album art and music videos, and distributes all her work digitally. She puts everything on Bandcamp and Soundcloud at first, and eventually on other streaming platforms through an online distributor.

Stacy Buchanan, WGBH

YouTube

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Thunderpussy

Breathing life back into rock 'n' roll, and leaving us empowered and liberated in its wake.

Thunderpussy
Jake Clifford/Courtesy of the artist

Goes well with: rocking out

Thunderpussy has spent the last two years refining its sound in Seattle, where its reputation and following had the band selling out clubs before it even had an album. When you see Thunderpussy in concert, you'll understand why. Thunderpussy is everything you want in rock — raw, spontaneous, bombastic, outrageous — and they've got the look, songs, musicianship and dynamic live show to take your breath away.

While the quartet awaits the outcome of a federal court case that will determine whether they can trademark their name, this is for certain: Thunderpussy deserves the recognition. Far from "immoral," the band breathes life back into rock 'n' roll, leaving us empowered and liberated in the wake of its exhilarating songs. Long live rock 'n' roll!

Thunderpussy recently signed a multiple-album deal with Stardog/Republic Records. Sylvia Massy, who has worked with Tool, Prince and System of a Down, produced the band's debut album, which will drop this spring.

Kevin Cole, KEXP

YouTube

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WebsterX

At the center of Milwaukee's growing hip-hop scene, a tall, skinny kid is ready for the national spotlight.

WebsterX
Nick Edmonds/Courtesy of the artist

Goes well with: feeling love at the end of the world, crowd surfing, inspiring a whole city

Should open for: Tyler, the Creator, Lupe Fiasco, Chance the Rapper

WebsterX, a tall, skinny kid with an awkward mustache, stands in the center of Milwaukee's music scene. Recipient of the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel's No. 1 album of 2017, the Critics Choice album of the year at the Radio Milwaukee Music Awards and his face on the cover of Milwaukee Magazine, WebsterX comes from a city that loves him. And he's had a strong hand in building that scene; he performs with the New Age Narcissism collective, a rotating cast of musicians, dancers and creatives who share stages and call each other family.

When he's not on stage inspiring an audience, he can be found in the community inspiring the next generation. WebsterX helped found FREESPACE, a monthly event designed to give high school students a venue to create, learn and perform with more established local acts. The event itself has created its own community — a sense of family for Milwaukee's young performers.

On stage and off, WebsterX is a dynamic person. He is electricity with a microphone, a big heart, a mentor — and he's ready for the national spotlight.

Jordan Lee, Radio Milwaukee

YouTube

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