Maine Wants Historic Shed That Floated Into Canada Returned The building, damaged in a blizzard, is a national historic landmark — part of Maine's fishing history. But so far Canada won't give it back, citing its citizens' salvage rights.
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Maine Wants Historic Shed That Floated Into Canada Returned

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Maine Wants Historic Shed That Floated Into Canada Returned

Maine Wants Historic Shed That Floated Into Canada Returned

Maine Wants Historic Shed That Floated Into Canada Returned

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/577565293/577565294" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The building, damaged in a blizzard, is a national historic landmark — part of Maine's fishing history. But so far Canada won't give it back, citing its citizens' salvage rights.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm David Greene. Salvage law deals with shipwrecks and lost vessels - you know, like who owns the treasure if it's found. But does it apply to buildings? That's one question after a shed in Maine was torn from its moorings during a blizzard and floated to Canada. The damaged building is a national historic landmark, part of Maine's fishing history. But so far, Canada won't give it back, citing its citizens salvage rights. For two countries that usually get along so well, isn't this fishy? It's MORNING EDITION.

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