Northern Arizona University Researcher Studies Dog Communication The researcher wants to better understand what dogs say with tail wagging or growling. His efforts come after 30 years studying the language of prairie dogs.

Northern Arizona University Researcher Studies Dog Communication

Northern Arizona University Researcher Studies Dog Communication

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The researcher wants to better understand what dogs say with tail wagging or growling. His efforts come after 30 years studying the language of prairie dogs.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Steve Inskeep. Computer apps help you translate another language. And soon, artificial intelligence may help you speak dog. A researcher at Northern Arizona University is studying dog communication, wants to better understand what dogs say with tail wagging or growling. His efforts come after 30 years studying the language of prairie dogs. And someday, it's hoped we'll find out if dogs have anything to say beyond feed me, pet me, feed me again, time to go out. It's MORNING EDITION. Woof.

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