Frozen Ball Of Human Waste Falls From Sky When scientists examined the 20 pound rock, they determine it probably was not a meteor. Officials believe it is a frozen ball of excrement and are having samples tested.

Frozen Ball Of Human Waste Falls From Sky

Frozen Ball Of Human Waste Falls From Sky

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When scientists examined the 20 pound rock, they determine it probably was not a meteor. Officials believe it is a frozen ball of excrement and are having samples tested.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good. Morning, I'm David Greene. It is not every day you get a souvenir from space. And so if a small meteor fell into your yard, you might keep it, right? Some villagers in India did. But then scientists examined the 20-pound rock and...

(SOUNDBITE OF FILM, "JOE DIRT")

HAMILTON CAMP: (As Meteor Bert) Well, it ain't a meteor.

GREENE: This scene from the movie "Joe Dirt" became way too real for this village.

(SOUNDBITE OF FILM, "JOE DIRT")

CAMP: (As Meteor Bert) Oh, yeah. See, them airplanes, they dump their toilets 36,000 feet and the stuff freezes and falls to Earth. We call them Boeing bombs.

GREENE: Ew. It's MORNING EDITION.

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