The Mandela Effect We ask questions about popular instances of the Mandela Effect, and contestants dive into their memories in order to sort fact from fiction.
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The Mandela Effect

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The Mandela Effect

The Mandela Effect

The Mandela Effect

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Contestants Michael Serafino and Ciera Velarde play a game on the Ask Me Another stage at the Bell House in Brooklyn, New York. Mike Katzif/NPR hide caption

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Mike Katzif/NPR

Contestants Michael Serafino and Ciera Velarde play a game on the Ask Me Another stage at the Bell House in Brooklyn, New York.

Mike Katzif/NPR

The Mandela Effect is an Internet phenomenon where a group of people share a common misconception. Some people say it's evidence for alternate universes; we say it's a fun topic for a silly trivia game. We ask questions about popular instances of the Mandela Effect, and contestants dive into their memories in order to sort fact from fiction.

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