Suspect Temporarily Eludes Police By Leaping Onto Floating Ice Authorities in New Brunswick, Canada, say the suspect floated downriver on the piece of ice, refusing help along the way. When he finally got off the block of ice, he was arrested on land.
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Suspect Temporarily Eludes Police By Leaping Onto Floating Ice

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Suspect Temporarily Eludes Police By Leaping Onto Floating Ice

Suspect Temporarily Eludes Police By Leaping Onto Floating Ice

Suspect Temporarily Eludes Police By Leaping Onto Floating Ice

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/588776294/588776295" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Authorities in New Brunswick, Canada, say the suspect floated downriver on the piece of ice, refusing help along the way. When he finally got off the block of ice, he was arrested on land.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep. Kids know the scene in "Rudolph The Red-Nosed Reindeer" where the heroes are chased by a snow monster...

(SOUNDBITE OF FILM, "RUDOLPH THE RED-NOSED REINDEER")

LARRY D. MANN: (As Yukon Cornelius) We'll have to outwit the fiend with our superior intelligence.

INSKEEP: ...And escape on a floating ice block.

(SOUNDBITE OF FILM, "RUDOLPH THE RED-NOSED REINDEER")

MANN: (As Yukon Cornelius) Do-it-yourself ice breaks.

INSKEEP: Maybe this went through the mind of a real-life Canadian man. Police were chasing a suspect in New Brunswick when he leaped onto a floating block of ice. He floated down river, refusing help, and finally got off on his own only to be arrested on land. It's MORNING EDITION.

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