A Basketball Player Lets A Record Stand At a recent game, a University of Iowa player was poised to break a school record of 34 consecutive free throws. But he missed, on purpose, to honor the player who held the record.
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A Basketball Player Lets A Record Stand

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A Basketball Player Lets A Record Stand

A Basketball Player Lets A Record Stand

A Basketball Player Lets A Record Stand

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At a recent game, a University of Iowa player was poised to break a school record of 34 consecutive free throws. But he missed, on purpose, to honor the player who held the record.

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

You know, sometimes a miss is a slam dunk. Jordan Bohannon, a point guard on the University of Iowa Hawkeyes men's basketball team, was set to break the school's all-time record of 34 free throws in a row this week in a game against Northwestern. The record was set by Iowa's Chris Street, but he died in a car accident in the middle of the 1993 season. Chris Street's parents were in the stands this week to congratulate Jordan Bohannon for breaking their son's record. He's gotten to know and love them, so when he got to the free throw line, he clanked the ball off the front of the rim on purpose. So Chris Street keeps the record that he set 25 years ago.

Jordan Bohannon made two free throws thereafter, finished the game with 25 points, and Iowa won. But he told the Big Ten Network, obviously, that record deserves to stay in his name. And Chris Street's parents said that was Jordan's decision. And if that's what he wanted to do, then we appreciate it. We certainly, in the future, want him to get another shot at it.

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