Waffle House Waitress Gets A Scholarship After Helping Customer Evoni Williams noticed an elderly customer needed help cutting up his ham. After a video of her cutting up his food went viral, Texas Southern University rewarded her with a $16,000 scholarship.
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Waffle House Waitress Gets A Scholarship After Helping Customer

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Waffle House Waitress Gets A Scholarship After Helping Customer

Waffle House Waitress Gets A Scholarship After Helping Customer

Waffle House Waitress Gets A Scholarship After Helping Customer

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/592823626/592823627" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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Evoni Williams noticed an elderly customer needed help cutting up his ham. After a video of her cutting up his food went viral, Texas Southern University rewarded her with a $16,000 scholarship.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Rachel Martin with a straight up feel-good story. It's about an 18-year-old Waffle House employee named Evoni Williams. One of her regular customers in La Marque, Texas, was having a hard time eating after his surgery. So Evoni cut up his food for him. Someone snapped a photo, and the story went viral. When the city found out about Evoni's kindness, they declared a day in her honor, and Texas Southern University gave her a one-year scholarship. Evoni said, it was just the right thing to do. It's MORNING EDITION.

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