Kangaroo Crossing Sign Inquiry Leads To Its Demise WOSU in Columbus, Ohio wondered why there was a "kangaroo crossing" sign on one street. They asked the city, who took it down. Now neighbors are upset.
NPR logo

Kangaroo Crossing Sign Inquiry Leads To Its Demise

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/593398881/593398882" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Kangaroo Crossing Sign Inquiry Leads To Its Demise

Kangaroo Crossing Sign Inquiry Leads To Its Demise

Kangaroo Crossing Sign Inquiry Leads To Its Demise

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/593398881/593398882" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

WOSU in Columbus, Ohio wondered why there was a "kangaroo crossing" sign on one street. They asked the city, who took it down. Now neighbors are upset.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm David Greene, rising in defense of journalism. Staff at WOSU, the public radio station in Columbus, Ohio, were curious. They asked why city officials had a kangaroo crossing sign up on one street when there are no kangaroos in Ohio. Turns out a neighbor put it up years ago to be funny. And after WOSU inquired, the city this week removed the sign. Neighbors were mad. One wrote on Facebook that someone didn't have a sense of humor. Well, WOSU, kudos for doing your job. It's MORNING EDITION.

Copyright © 2018 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.