Scrunchies Are Back, 'Wall Street Journal' Headline Exclaims The scrunchie is a puffy fabric hair tie that was big in the 80s and 90s. As evidence of its longevity, the Journal points to Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsberg who uses one almost daily.
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Scrunchies Are Back, 'Wall Street Journal' Headline Exclaims

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Scrunchies Are Back, 'Wall Street Journal' Headline Exclaims

Scrunchies Are Back, 'Wall Street Journal' Headline Exclaims

Scrunchies Are Back, 'Wall Street Journal' Headline Exclaims

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/595967389/595967390" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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The scrunchie is a puffy fabric hair tie that was big in the 80s and 90s. As evidence of its longevity, the Journal points to Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsberg who uses one almost daily.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Rachel Martin. A Wall Street Journal story this week claimed that the scrunchie is back - God help us - or maybe it never went away. For those who don't know, the scrunchie is that puffy, fabric hair tie that was everywhere in the '80s and '90s. As evidence of its longevity, The Journal pointed to Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg who wears a scrunchie in her hair almost every day. Ginsburg told The Journal my best scrunchies come from Zurich, next best, London and third best, Rome. You be you, RBG. It's MORNING EDITION.

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