Court Rules Iowa Man May Say His Hometown Stinks Josh Harms was sick of the smell of "rancid dog food" coming from a processing plant. His website urged people not to move to Sibley. The town wanted the site taken down. A court sided with Harms.
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Court Rules Iowa Man May Say His Hometown Stinks

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Court Rules Iowa Man May Say His Hometown Stinks

Court Rules Iowa Man May Say His Hometown Stinks

Court Rules Iowa Man May Say His Hometown Stinks

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/598192140/598192141" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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Josh Harms was sick of the smell of "rancid dog food" coming from a processing plant. His website urged people not to move to Sibley. The town wanted the site taken down. A court sided with Harms.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm David Greene. Josh Harms was sick of the smell of rancid dog food odor he said was coming from a processing plant in his hometown of Sibley, Iowa. So he started a website saying people might not want to move there. Local officials ordered him to take down the site. Mr. Harms countered, saying it is his right to speak out in this country. A federal court agreed. The town has to pay Harms attorney fees and hold trainings for city staff about the First Amendment. It's MORNING EDITION.

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