Robin Olson: Tiny Desk Concert Hear the elusive avant-garde pianist debut a new piece, etched in shimmering chords and dark, lamenting octaves.

Tiny Desk

Robin Olson

Editor's note on April 2, 2018: You may have figured this out already — this story was an April Fools' joke. It's not real. We hope you enjoyed it.

"Not all pianists are created in equal temperament," Robin Olson told a small but enthusiastic audience behind NPR Music's storied Tiny Desk. The pianist, hailed as an "avant-garde gewandhaus" by Berlin's Staubzeitung, is as celebrated for his cryptic maxims as he is for his inscrutable music.

Olson's trademark style — shooting clusters of shimmering chords and solitary, pearlescent pitches into reverberant space — has led him to exalted concert halls and to work with a broad array of stars such as Yuja Wang, Aretha Franklin, Chick Corea and Emanuel Ax.

Drawing from the seminal Plink technique, cultivated among the Schlammstadt School of composers in the 1950s, Olson is regarded as a leading technician of the more expansive Neo-Plink style. "Intervals have coincident partials," Olson explains. "They create a form of dissonance, called 'beats,' by which pitches are set for optimum harmonicity."

From a bulging briefcase, Olson pulls out any number tools to alter specific pitches, as in his opening piece, "A 440." He threads ribbons of felt between piano strings to mimic the muted cries of the Asian dung beetle in "The Temperament," from his 2014 collection Infinite Chasms.

Olson surprised everyone at the Tiny Desk by debuting a new piece, "Tuning the Bass," wherein his inventive command of the instrument's lower register highlighted spaces between keening dark octaves.

He may be considered a challenging artist, but Olson, through the essential humanity of his performance, reveals the efforts of almost any other living pianist to be little more than a joke.

Set List

  • "A 440"
  • "The Temperament"
  • "Tuning the Bass"

Credits

Producers: Tom Huizenga, Morgan Noelle Smith; Creative Director: Bob Boilen; Audio Engineer: Josh Rogosin; Videographers: Morgan Noelle Smith, Dani Lyman; Production Assistant: Joshua Bote; Photo: Jenna Sterner/NPR.

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