Why Is Your Boss Bad At His Job? It May Be The 'Peter Principle' At Work Workers with a strong sales record were likely to be promoted into managerial positions, yet they tended to be worse at managerial jobs than those who were low-performing workers.
NPR logo

Why Is Your Boss Bad At His Job? It May Be The 'Peter Principle' At Work

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/599077775/599077776" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Why Is Your Boss Bad At His Job? It May Be The 'Peter Principle' At Work

Why Is Your Boss Bad At His Job? It May Be The 'Peter Principle' At Work

Why Is Your Boss Bad At His Job? It May Be The 'Peter Principle' At Work

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/599077775/599077776" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Not every great employee is a great manager. Camelia Dobrin/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

toggle caption
Camelia Dobrin/Getty Images/Ikon Images

Why do good employees sometimes go on to be bad bosses? Kelly Shue, a professor of finance at Yale University, says it may have to do with what's known as the 'Peter Principle.'