The Week In News, In Verse It's been a whirlwind week in Washington, D.C., with news about Syria, the Russia investigation and Scott Pruitt's spending at the EPA. NPR's Scott Simon sums it all up, with a poem.
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The Week In News, In Verse

Some of the faces of this never-ending cycle of BREAKING NEWS: (top row, from left) Rod Rosenstein, Stormy Daniels and Scott Pruitt, and (bottom row, from left) John Bolton, Mark Zuckerberg and President Trump. Reuters hide caption

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Some of the faces of this never-ending cycle of BREAKING NEWS: (top row, from left) Rod Rosenstein, Stormy Daniels and Scott Pruitt, and (bottom row, from left) John Bolton, Mark Zuckerberg and President Trump.

Reuters

How do you keep up on all the news?

I think many Americans ask that of one another these days. There's BREAKING NEWS every few minutes that seems to leave all previous BREAKING NEWS stories behind.

News of a horrifying chemical attack in Syria is soon superseded by news of a raid on the offices of a longtime Trump attorney who may have figured into other stories that have been BREAKING NEWS.

News of the founder of Facebook being grilled by members of Congress about foreign entities helping themselves to the personal information of millions of Americans is soon superseded by news that a New York doorman was paid to keep quiet about an alleged story about Donald Trump and a housekeeper.

Maybe we could all use a mnemonic device to keep all the names and details in the news in our minds — like a poem:

Stormy Daniels set off a storm
When she said Trump didn't sign
their nondisclosure form.
Michael Avenatti is her savvy counselor
always on-set with Anderson Cooper
While Michael Cohen is Trump's advocate
Who says hocking your house to help a client
Isn't extravagant.

There are charges about Scott Pruitt at the EPA
In each news cycle every day.
He only flies in first-class seats
And sleeps in fresh-pressed sheets
In a condo owned by lobbyists
Who said they had to nag him to pay the rent.

Tillerson and Shulkin: given the boot,
But the attorney general is left to droop.
Jeff Sessions said he'd recuse himself.
The president would just like to lose him.

Rod Rosenstein might now have an ulcer
From hiring, or not firing, Bob Mueller.
Will he stay — or will he be let go? — is the question
to give him indigestion.

John Bolton renounced and bounced all
his staff at the National Security Council.
While senators asked Mike Pompeo if he was strong
enough to tell the president if he was wrong
about Russia, North Korea or Bob Mueller.

Other names fly by, each hour, in the news:
Karen McDougal and Summer Zervos
Comey, Zuckerberg, and Kim Jong Un,
Scooter Libby and Dino Sajudin —
the Trump Tower doorman whose name
is simply too musical not to be usin'.

And then the president tweets, "slime ball."

Attention is intense
for several minutes
then we go on to other business
When despots use chemical weapons,
our impressions
last just until the next BREAKING NEWS
lights a fuse.
We may be overstuffed with stressful news —
and underinformed.

Correction April 14, 2018

A caption in a previous version of this story incorrectly gave Rod Rosenstein's first name as Rob.