Avoid Traffic Fines By Confessing Online Traffic police in southwest China are telling drivers accused of minor offenses they can avoid a fine if they confess on social media. But the confession must get 20 likes.

Avoid Traffic Fines By Confessing Online

Avoid Traffic Fines By Confessing Online

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Traffic police in southwest China are telling drivers accused of minor offenses they can avoid a fine if they confess on social media. But the confession must get 20 likes.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep with a high-stakes social media post. Communist China was once famous for self-criticisms. If you were caught doing anything the party didn't like, you might have to denounce yourself. Traffic police in southwest China brought that idea to the social media age. They tell drivers accused of minor offences they can avoid a fine if they confess online, and the confession must get 20 likes. So you're counting on your online friends to get you off. It's MORNING EDITION.

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