#NPRPoetry Project: Final Listener Submissions It's the last weekend in April, and the last weekend of the #NPRPoetry project on Twitter. NPR's Michel Martin shares some final submissions from listeners.
NPR logo #NPRPoetry Project: Final Listener Submissions

#NPRPoetry Project: Final Listener Submissions

It's the last weekend in April, and the last weekend of the #NPRPoetry project on Twitter. NPR's Michel Martin shares some final submissions from listeners.

#NPRPoetry Project: Final Listener Submissions

Audio will be available later today.

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

And now let's take a poetry break. All month, we've been asking listeners to tweet us their original poems using the hashtag #NPRPoetry. And we've received so many good ones, we want to take a minute to feature a few before the month ends. Now, many poems had to do with the particular challenges of writing poetry for Twitter, like this one from Jakki Hansen of Houston, Texas, read by NPR producer Sydney Harper.

SYDNEY HARPER, BYLINE: (Reading) I wanted to write a poem about defenestration, but given the very strict word limitation, I guess that's out the window.

MARTIN: (Laughter) Defenestration is defined as the action of throwing something or someone out of a window. Get it? Of course, not all of the poems you sent us are funny. Many were thoughtful and poignant like this one, written and read by David Parker in Fresno, Calif.

DAVID PARKER: (Reading) There is a cemetery just off the 405, all its pretty white rose reminding eventually, all traffic stops.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

MARTIN: Many of you found the beauty and humor in chores and daily routine, like Wilson Scott in Phoenix, Ariz. His poem is read by producer Marc Rivers.

MARC RIVERS, BYLINE: (Reading) The next time you peel an onion, imagine you're peeling the world. Either would explain the tears.

MARTIN: That's one of many poems that were inspired by food. Here's one from Jeff Lefkowitz in Brooklyn.

JEFF LEFKOWITZ: (Reading) I ate a bagel and looked at the sky. The bagel was everything. The sky was, too.

MARTIN: Jeff tells us that while the poem might seem light and fun, it came to him as he was struggling to come to terms with his own mortality.

LEFKOWITZ: And also the idea of placing an order for everything is, like - you know, I want the one that has poppy seeds and garlic and salt and love and remorse and regret and desire - that's the bagel I want - is kind of a goofy idea.

MARTIN: Also, cream cheese, Jeff. Don't forget the cream cheese.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

MARTIN: Finally, today, we leave you with one more by Ken Reynolds, who appears to have joined Twitter for the first time just to participate in our month-long poetry celebration. You go, Ken. Ken's poem is read by reporter Colin Dwyer, who helped us relaunch the hash tag #NPRPoetry three years ago.

COLIN DWYER, BYLINE: (Reading) Only now do I know that one can be too late. But it's too late. How was I to know?

MARTIN: Thank you, Ken Reynolds. Your poem brings us to a very important point. It is not too late to get your poem on Twitter, but it is almost too late. It's almost the end of the month, so don't wait. Tweet us your poems using the hashtag #NPRPoetry.

(SOUNDBITE OF MATTHEW DEAR'S "BAD ONES")

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