The Durian Fruit Is Known For Its Potential Stench At a university in Melbourne, Australia, students reported a possible gas leak. Firefighters discovered the problem: a rotting durian left in a cabinet.
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The Durian Fruit Is Known For Its Potential Stench

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The Durian Fruit Is Known For Its Potential Stench

The Durian Fruit Is Known For Its Potential Stench

The Durian Fruit Is Known For Its Potential Stench

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/606990225/606990226" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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At a university in Melbourne, Australia, students reported a possible gas leak. Firefighters discovered the problem: a rotting durian left in a cabinet.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm David Greene. At a university in Melbourne, Australia, students reported a possible gas leak. More than 500 people were evacuated, according to the BBC. Firefighters wearing protective masks finally found the source of the leak, if you can call it that - a rotting durian fruit left in a cabinet. The tropical fruit is known for its awful stench, and that's when it's ripe. Smithsonian Magazine says durians smell like turpentine and onions garnished with a gym sock. You're listening to MORNING EDITION.

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