Japan's Striking Bus Drivers Refuse To Charge Customers The drivers realized that if they stopped working, the public would suffer. They settled on a compromise: While on strike, they'll still drive their routes but are giving the rides for free.
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Japan's Striking Bus Drivers Refuse To Charge Customers

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Japan's Striking Bus Drivers Refuse To Charge Customers

Japan's Striking Bus Drivers Refuse To Charge Customers

Japan's Striking Bus Drivers Refuse To Charge Customers

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/607996787/607996791" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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The drivers realized that if they stopped working, the public would suffer. They settled on a compromise: While on strike, they'll still drive their routes but are giving the rides for free.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Ohayou gozaimasu. I'm Rachel Martin with news from Japan today. A group of bus drivers in Okayama are on strike. They're demanding that their employer give them more job security. The drivers realize, though, that if they stopped driving and protest, the Japanese public would end up suffering the most with fewer buses to ride. So the drivers settled on a compromise. They're technically on strike, but still driving and giving all their rides for free, which surely has riders saying doumo arigatou gozaimasu. It's MORNING EDITION.

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