Man Is Accused Of Moving UPS Headquarters To His Apartment Prosecutors in Chicago say the man received thousands of pieces of mail intended for the company — including checks and corporate credit cards.
NPR logo

Man Is Accused Of Moving UPS Headquarters To His Apartment

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/610315755/610315756" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Man Is Accused Of Moving UPS Headquarters To His Apartment

Man Is Accused Of Moving UPS Headquarters To His Apartment

Man Is Accused Of Moving UPS Headquarters To His Apartment

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/610315755/610315756" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Prosecutors in Chicago say the man received thousands of pieces of mail intended for the company — including checks and corporate credit cards.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm David Greene. Postal workers in Chicago were doing their jobs. I mean, a change of address form came in, and corporate headquarters for UPS was now a tiny apartment. The CEO's credit cards were delivered there. So were sensitive documents. This went on, the Chicago Tribune reports, until the resident of the apartment tried to deposit checks for UPS in his account. The guy's facing charges for mail theft and fraud, so he may have to change his address now to prison. It's MORNING EDITION.

Copyright © 2018 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.