David Price Says Fortnite Not To Blame For Carpal Tunnel Boston Red Sox player David Price developed carpal tunnel syndrome. He plays a lot of the video game Fortnite. He says the game is not the cause — but says he'll cut back on gaming at ballgames.
NPR logo

David Price Says Fortnite Not To Blame For Carpal Tunnel

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/611538504/611538505" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
David Price Says Fortnite Not To Blame For Carpal Tunnel

David Price Says Fortnite Not To Blame For Carpal Tunnel

David Price Says Fortnite Not To Blame For Carpal Tunnel

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/611538504/611538505" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Boston Red Sox player David Price developed carpal tunnel syndrome. He plays a lot of the video game Fortnite. He says the game is not the cause — but says he'll cut back on gaming at ballgames.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Rachel Martin. The video game Fortnite is huge. Even major league ballplayers are into it. They play it between games, traveling or downtime at the ballpark. But there can be negative consequences. Boston Red Sox pitcher David Price is known to have a Fortnite habit. And last week, he missed his start against the New York Yankees because of a mild case of carpal tunnel syndrome that could have been caused by too much gaming. Price says he'll stop playing Fortnite - at least at the ballpark. It's MORNING EDITION.

Copyright © 2018 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.