Tunisian Soccer Player Appears To Fake Injuries To Break Fast In a couple recent games Mouez Hassen appears to get injured right around sundown. It gives the players, who have been fasting for Ramadan, the chance to have water and food.
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Tunisian Soccer Player Appears To Fake Injuries To Break Fast

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Tunisian Soccer Player Appears To Fake Injuries To Break Fast

Tunisian Soccer Player Appears To Fake Injuries To Break Fast

Tunisian Soccer Player Appears To Fake Injuries To Break Fast

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In a couple recent games Mouez Hassen appears to get injured right around sundown. It gives the players, who have been fasting for Ramadan, the chance to have water and food.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Rachel Martin. Soccer players are accused of dramatizing injuries all the time in order to draw penalties. The goalie for Tunisia's national soccer team had a different, more basic motive. He wanted his teammates to be able to take a water break. It's Ramadan so he and his teammates are fasting and really lethargic. So in a couple of recent games, Mouez Hassen appears to get injured right around sundown. It helped. The team came back from deficits both times and finished the games 2-2. It's MORNING EDITION.

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