Your Feelings On Family Separations At The Border One of our goals on 1A is to act as a kind of national mirror — to reflect what's happening and ask what it says about us.

That's a question many Americans have been asking themselves about the Trump Administration's decision to separate families who try to cross the border.

A children's pediatrician who assists with migrant children talked about the long-term effects of toxic stress. An 80-year-old caller from Maine said she was headed to a protest in front of a lawmaker's office.
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Your Feelings On Family Separations At The Border

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Your Feelings On Family Separations At The Border

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Your Feelings On Family Separations At The Border

Your Feelings On Family Separations At The Border

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/621851194/621965902" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

A two-year-old Honduran asylum seeker cries as her mother is searched and detained near the U.S.-Mexico border on June 12 in McAllen, Texas. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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John Moore/Getty Images

A two-year-old Honduran asylum seeker cries as her mother is searched and detained near the U.S.-Mexico border on June 12 in McAllen, Texas.

John Moore/Getty Images

One of our goals on 1A is to act as a kind of national mirror — to reflect what's happening and ask what it says about us.

That's a question many Americans have been asking themselves about the Trump Administration's decision to separate families who try to cross the border.

So we asked for your thoughts. And a lot of you told us how you felt. A children's pediatrician who assists with migrant children talked about the long-term effects of toxic stress. An 80-year-old caller from Maine said she was headed to a protest in front of a lawmaker's office.

We also spoke with Vox senior immigration reporter Dara Lind and Professor Erika Lee, the Director of the Immigration History Research Center at the University of Minnesota. "The trends that we're seeing today are part of a much longer trajectory of the criminalization of immigrants," Professor Lee says. "The other longer trend is using detention as deterrence."

What kind of country are we? What kind of country do we want to be?