America, Allies And A Changing World Order President Trump's approach to foreign policy has been described as "repeal without replace" — scrapping an American-led world order in favor of an international free-for-all, preferring one-on-one deals to multinational agreements.

What does all of this mean for Europe, China, Russia — and for America's place as a leader on the world stage?

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America, Allies And A Changing World Order

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America, Allies And A Changing World Order

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America, Allies And A Changing World Order

America, Allies And A Changing World Order

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German Chancellor Angela Merkel and U.S. President Donald Trump attend the opening ceremony at the 2018 NATO Summit in Brussels, Belgium. Sean Gallup/Getty Images hide caption

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German Chancellor Angela Merkel and U.S. President Donald Trump attend the opening ceremony at the 2018 NATO Summit in Brussels, Belgium.

Sean Gallup/Getty Images

President Trump's approach to foreign policy has been described as "repeal without replace" — scrapping an American-led world order in favor of an international free-for-all, preferring one-on-one deals to multinational agreements.

"[President Trump's] core theme is that the U.S. is a sucker that's being taken advantage by all of these countries around the world, especially his European allies," one of our panelists says. "He will look for any way to attack Europeans on that basis."

With American foreign policy that seems to change every moment, can the alliances that have sustained the West survive? This take from The Atlantic suggests that they can:

At the same time, there are U.S. trade conflicts with China, Europe, Canada and Mexico, and international concern over the outcome of Trump's upcoming meeting with Russian president Vladimir Putin.

What should we make of the intersection between economic power and military might? And what does all of this mean for Europe, China, Russia — and for America's place as a leader on the world stage?